9th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair April 29th, 2017

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9thposter1                             Download the 8 1/2 x 11, poster here:9thposter

The 9th Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair, April 29th 2017 at the Manila community Center 1611 peninsula drive Arcata CA 95521

Yes! Almost a decade of the Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair! We are excited to have this coming book fair at a time when Anarchism is being increasingly put into action on a large scale in many  revolutionary  movements around the country and around the world. There is so much to be excited about and to take inspiration and ideas from as we come together to face some of the greatest challenges of our times.

 

We are paying close attention to the actions to end prison slavery. We have been studying autonomous democracy to undermine the material basis of patriarchy, white supremacy, and capitalism. We are living in a time where revolutionary movements are going beyond democracy and creating free societies, where all institutions exist to serve a function for those involved, where participation is voluntary.

Social movements are engaging in compelling experiments to create cop-free spaces and rapid response organizations to fill the emergency response role in their communities. The great struggles against the destruction of the forests, the earth, and the pollution of the water have brought many together as a force to be reckoned with.

There are so many ideas and opportunities we would like to explore with the community this coming Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair.

 

We invite you to share your ideas for presentations and send tabling requests to:

Humboldt grassroots [nospaces] at rise up dot net

https://www.facebook.com/humboldt.grassroots/

on twitter @humboldtgrassr1

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8th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair January 23rd 2016

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Poster 8.5x11 2016

The year 2015  was one of inspiring resistance and revolution. Let’s carry that same ferocity into the new year! We are glad to be starting 2016 off with the 8th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair.

The Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair plays a part in strengthening connections and solidarity for building a new world.

We are excited, as many of you are, about the Rojava revolution, along with the uprisings across the U.S. There is a lot happening; lots to talk about!

The 8th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair is bringing it January 23rd, 2016!

This is a FREE, all-day, radical event! Join us in the main hall at 10am to nourish your body with some of the FREE FOOD cooked up by Food Not Bombs and friends (which they’ll be serving up the whole day), browse the tables of radical publishers and community groups, mingle with some good, free-thinking folk, listen to a little comedy from Robo and poetry from Gork and Jovannah. This is a family-friendly event with the Kid’s Corner featuring FREE CHILD CARE and activities, hosted this year by The YES House. The kid’s can hang out there while you move between the two meeting rooms to catch inspiring presentations from authors and activists and share your own ideas and experiences during interactive discussions, beginning at 11am.

Here is the line-up so far:

11am:
Room A:
Black Rose Anarchist Federation:
Black Rose is a nation-wide, anarchist federation in the U.S. that formed in 2013 and has been involved in struggles from Ferguson to Rojava. Hear about this ambitious and exciting project from Francisco, a member of Black Rose LA.

 
Room B:
Earth First!
Tales of frontline forest defense in so-called “Humboldt County.” With the last bits of old-growth forests remaining and the system’s failure to protect them, we must do it ourselves. From road blockades to tree-sits, defeats to victories. Hear the wolves howling and the owls hooting. For the wild!

12pm:
Room A:
Addressing Our Needs Through Direct Action and Cooperation:
Come join us for an open discussion led by Ryan Ayala, a recent graduate from HSU in Psychology. Looking at the Queer community, he will discuss the challenges of bureaucracy in making social change and ways in which such topics as harm reduction can be approached in substance abuse.

Room B:
Workers Power Panel:
The Industrial Workers of the World will once again be present at the Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair. Providing a glimpse into the Wobblie’s secrets of on-the-job organizing and spells to rid workers of bosses and other demons set against the working class by the atrocities of Capitalism. Whether you toil away your days taking orders from moms and pops for minuscule pay at restaurants and boutiques or you work at low paying, part-time jobs with no benefits at chain stores, you may benefit from a few devices to wrangle profits from the profiteers. Learn about and discuss successful job actions like slow-downs, sick-outs, safety meetings, and such. Discuss how to organize the aforementioned. Stay on the job earning meagre wages (which pay the rent) while you stick it to the boss. Remember you are a member of the working class, with a union card in your pocket. Whether you ride the rails, study in the library or toss pizzas, the IWW is here every day and we don’t contribute to slick politicians that promise one thing and do another. If you work, organize to improve working conditions. If you don’t work for a boss, carry your union card wherever you go. Meet Steve and Bruce, longtime Wobbly organizers and twenty-year members of the IWW. Steve is currently a ferry boat deckhand on San Francisco Bay. Bruce is a former truck and bus driver among other jobs.

1pm:
Room A:
Lessons for Rural and Small Town Anarchists:
Doug Gilbert discusses strategies and lessons learned from his involvement in the group Modesto Anarcho, based out of Modesto, California located in the Central Valley. Modesto Anarcho published a magazine of the same name, ran a social space, Firehouse 51, and was involved in a variety of struggles including organizing with families of those killed by police, gentrification, foreclosures, and housing, and much more. More than just a history, Gilbert will discuss how anarchists in small and rural towns face special challenges, especially in areas that do not have established anarchist groups and spaces.

Room B:
Crimethinc: Democracy or Freedom?
CrimethInc. ex-Workers’ Collective:
What’s the difference between democracy and anarchy?
Democracy is the most popular buzzword in politics. From the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the most radical social movements, nearly everyone claims to be democratic. In this provocative presentation, we will discuss what ties all these different understandings of democracy together and what sets anarchism apart. Reviewing how recent social movements have experimented with democratic rhetoric and practices, we will conclude by exploring other ways to understand what we are doing together when we make decisions.

2pm:

Room A:

The Governmentality of Immigration:

Human migration has created great challenges for both host societies and migrating communities, which have elicited dramatic responses from both populations. My academic and community work has examined the ways communities in Humboldt County have responded to changing social realities through the lens of governmentality (or the art and techniques of governance).  What I have attempted to do is to rigorously interrogate the various arts and techniques of governmentality. The investigation into this research topic is particularly timely because of the various legislative polices that are being advocated for on a local, state, and national level which has created an opportunity to further immigration advocacy work. Understanding that this is part of the work we must do because of the hardships the immigrant communities live under, it is not the end goal, which is to go beyond advocacy to dignity. My work uses the September 2008 raid on the Sun Valley Flower Farm as a starting point to explore the related social, political, economic, and cultural forces at play before, during, and after the raid. From there I continue the analysis to the current organizing efforts for immigrant policy reform in Humboldt County and beyond. Using militant research as a theoretical framework for the organizing work. I contend that the outcomes of this research can have local implications as it could inform local organizing efforts and unpack interlocking systems of oppression in operation in Humboldt County.

 
Room B:
Student Unions and Combative Syndicalism:
Fannie from Montreal will be Skyping in to talk about their experience in the largest and most successful student strike, which helped bring about the largest general strike in Canadian history. They will discuss the ideas, methods, and organization that made it all possible. There may also be organizers from HSU to present some of their organizing work.
http://freeeducationmontreal.org/confrontational-combative-syndicalism/

3pm:
Room A:
Anarchist Organizations In Social Movements Panel:
Members from Humboldt Grassroots, Black Rose Anarchist Federation LA, and Crimethinc will discuss how their organizations contribute to a wide variety of social movements and why it’s important to bring anarchist voices to these movements.

 
4pm:
Room A:
Slam Poetry Workshop:
Gork Burns and Jovannah Hoboo

Room B:
The Rojava Revolution:
Our keynote speaker will be Paul Z. Simmons, journalist, and author recently back from the Rojava Revolution. Writing under the pen name, El Errante, he is the author of a series of recent dispatches from the liberated territories of Rojava in Northern Syria. Simons has just returned from a region besieged by war yet is also in the midst of one of the most far-reaching social experiments of the 21st Century: the ‘Rojava Revolution.’ The liberated territories of Rojava are a thriving example in new forms of democratic practice and of a people who are overturning traditional, coercive institutions in favor of direct democracy and the empowerment and enfranchisement of women. Simons talks about his experiences including crossing international boundaries under false pretenses, attending commune meetings in Kobane, high-velocity detours around ISIS sympathetic villages, and the camaraderie of the YPG militias. Simons had full access to the various revolutionary organizations and militias and will discuss their mandates and implementation issues associated with realizing a new society. Paul Z. Simons’ report is a part adventure, part journalism, and part political analysis, of the Rojava Revolution.

We are sad to report that Michael Knapp, from TATORT Kurdistan, who was going to be visiting us from Berlin, Germany to discuss his own experience with the Rojava Revolution, has been denied entry by the U.S. government due to a recent policy which allows them to turn away without cause or explanation anyone who has even visited Northern Syria. How convenient during this refugee crisis. FUCK BORDERS!

5pm:
Room A:
Radical/ Independent Media Panel:
Greenfuse, Humboldt Free Radio Alliance, Slingshot, and 5th Estate.

You’re SO in, right?! Worried about how you’re gonna get there? We thought of that too! The Manila Community Center is one of the stops on the Redwood Transit Line that travels between Eureka and Arcata with stops in Manila. Get on the bus for us!

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The Police State Has To Go! : An Interview with Kristian Williams

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Humboldt Grassroots member Owl, Interviewed Kristian Williams author and long time member of Rose City Cop Watch. (http://www.kristianwilliams.com/ )10-7-2014

Owl: In your books Hurt and American Methods, you describe how law enforcement tactics are primarily used for intimidation and suppression of dissent, rather than actually preventing crime. How do these methods of control play out in our everyday lives?

In American Methods, and then in the collection Hurt, I focus specifically on torture. Largely I was driven to write on the subject because of the irresponsible way the Abu Ghraib scandal was being reported in the media. When those photos were released and Americans were confronted with this visceral evidence of torture, the dominant narrative treated it as some sort of anomaly –as though this handful of soldiers were somehow just uniquely sadistic. Every effort was made to divorce the abuse captured in those photos from the Bush administration’s policy decisions, and the nature of the invasion and occupation, and the institutional culture of the military. I wanted to push back on that. But I also wanted to push further. I wanted to show how those abuses connected to similar things done domestically, in prisons and at the hands of the police, and to consider what that might tell us about the nature of the state itself. What I found is, not only is torture much more common than we would like to think, but we can also find traces of it — or its threat — in many of the day-to-day operations of coercive institutions. Police make implicit (or sometimes explicit) threats in interrogation, they use “pain compliance” techniques to make people follow orders, they tighten handcuffs too tightly — which can cause a loss of circulation, and even nerve damage — to punish people for mouthing off. And then there’s the use of tasers and pepper spray against people who pose no credible threat, and sometimes people who have already been restrained. None of that is even out of the ordinary. In prisons, the list could be extended almost endlessly — strip searches, sleep deprivation, multi-point restraints, solitary confinement, rape. What I mean is, pain and humiliation are largely how those institutions work. How that affects your everyday life will depend, maybe more than anything else, on how privileged you are. If you’re a well-off white person, you may never even think about it. You surely know that police and prisons exist, and maybe you have some vague idea that they sometimes do bad things; or maybe you think they keep you safe — and yeah, depending on your race and class position, that may even be true. On the other hand, if you’re poor or a person of color — and especially if you’re poor and a person of color — it’s going to be a totally different story. There’s a good chance that you’d experience the criminal legal system as a permanent threat, with a realistic expectation that it doesn’t just promise arrest and imprisonment, but direct physical pain as well. Of course, that’s at the individual level. Socially, these institutions and their tactics help to maintain a system of stratification based on race and class, and that system determines practically everything about our daily lives — where we live, where we travel, who our friends are, what we do for work, our education, the quality of our health care, even our aspirations.

Owl: How do police enforce social hierarchy?

In Our Enemies in Blue, I argued that the main function of the police is to preserve existing inequalities, especially those based on race and class. That’s clear from the history, from use of force statistics, and it’s pretty obvious if you just look at who’s in prison. And that function informs everything they do, at every level — at the level of the officer on the street, at the level of department policy, at the level of the institution’s evolution. So for example, and most obviously, they maintain the hierarchy by enforcing laws that are themselves biased. I mean, it’s hardly a secret that, taken as a whole, the laws have a way of serving the interests of the rich. And then some laws specifically target poor people — laws against panhandling or sleeping on sidewalks, for example. I argue in the book that the whole concept of “public order,” as it’s generally understood, involves a large element of class and race bias, as the standards of order are typically the standards of the white (and historically, Protestant) middle and upper classes, and the job of the police is to impose them on communities that are poorer, Black, immigrant (and historically, Catholic). Then there’s the demonstrable fact that, even if the laws were somehow neutral, the enforcement is anything but. Police pay disproportionate attention to people who are relatively powerless — people of color and the poor especially. They stop them, search them, arrest them, hurt them, and kill them more than you’d expect just looking at the population statistics. That behavior doesn’t necessarily depend on the individual prejudices of the officers. It’s just that if you make trouble for powerful people, they’re likely to give you trouble back; if you make trouble for powerless people, you’re more likely to be rewarded. So the cops try to do their job in a way that maximizes the rewards and minimizes the hassle, which means they focus on powerless people, which in turn helps to keep those people powerless.

Owl: It’s clear that police enforce class and racial hierarchy. How do police enforce gender hierarchy?

They do, but not in the same way. Disproportionately — by a pretty wide margin — the police target men. Men are far more likely than women to be arrested, incarcerated, beaten, or killed by the cops. That’s not to say that women don’t suffer those same abuses; they do, but at lower rates. There are historical reasons for that: women have typically been disciplined more by other institutions, like mental hospitals or the family. Of course the police had a role there, too, facilitating the power of fathers and husbands by ignoring domestic violence. There’s also a patriarchal aspect to the public order question I was talking about a minute ago. The standards of order the police enforce, and the morality underlying those standards, historically entailed very strict gender roles, and to a lesser degree still do. Laws against cross-dressing have mostly fallen out of fashion, but the cops still treat transgender and other queer people as being suspicious as such. Women out alone at night — especially women of color — are pretty likely to be viewed by the cops as prostitutes. And, as far as that goes, the whole definition of prostitution as a police matter comes down to a question of enforcing sexual morality, the burden of which mostly falls on women. In general the history of public order policing was that it greatly limited the space available for women in public life, and left virtually no space for queers at all. That’s on top of the well-understood race and class biases. And then there are the police abuses that primarily affect women — like sexual harassment, inappropriate searches (including strip searches), sexual assault, and even rape. And again, our society being stratified as it is, the cops are far more likely to try that shit against women who are already marginalized in other ways — because of their race, poverty, immigration status, disability, and so on. Finally, there’s the awkward fact that when people offer the criminal justice system as a solution to sexual assault, domestic violence, forced prostitution, and rape, they’re essentially saying that the answer to male violence is more male violence. Violence here becomes a contest between men over the rights of women. Women are cast as passive victims, waiting to be saved — or not.

Owl: Restorative justice and transformative justice are the frameworks proposed to replace the current “injustice system” of police and prisons. What are they and how do they work?

If we’re serious about our anti-police, anti-prison politics, it’s important to come up with something that provides for safety but doesn’t reproduce the state’s punitive logic. So rather than approaching justice as a matter of catching bad guys and making them pay, transformative justice looks to repair harm done (so far as possible), and change the personal and social dynamics producing it. That means working with perpetrators to change their behavior, and working with communities to change the culture. Of course there’s no one correct way to do that. What works, or doesn’t, will depend very much on the context.

Owl: Does the radical movement already have alternatives to calling the police? Of course. Everybody does. In society as a whole, doing nothing is the most common response to crime. Most crime goes unreported. There are a lot of reasons for that, but I think the main one is that people don’t think the cops are going to help. And mostly they’re right. Another very common response to crime is simply more crime — individual acts of retaliation, group vendettas, that kind of thing. I think both the advantages and disadvantages of that approach are pretty clear. More useful, I think, are things like self-defense, or interrupting violence directly (for example, by breaking up a fight) — or better still, mediating conflicts before they escalate to that point. And then there are simple things like checking in with your drunk friends at a party and making sure they get home all right, or letting someone stay at your house if they don’t feel safe with their partner. I think there are two points to be made here. The first is that those are the sorts of things that people do all the time. The second is that the most successful alternatives to policing generally don’t get thought of in those terms because they intervene early enough that things never reach the point that cops would have seemed like a option. It’s much better to prevent a crisis than to respond to one.

 

Owl: Can a community currently help people with mental illness without using the police or prisons?

Sure, I think that’s mostly a matter of seeing what support people need and helping them get their needs met. That doesn’t just mean finding them counseling or whatever — that may not be what they need or want. It may mean something like offering to babysit their kids, so they can have some time to themselves. It may mean helping them break down a large task that feels overwhelming and seems impossible — like moving, or finding a job — into smaller tasks that feel more manageable. In our society, that sort of support is usually provided by friends and family, which poses all sort of difficulties if those people are also overburdened and there aren’t additional resources. It should also be pointed out, in this context, that most mentally ill people aren’t dangerous, even to themselves. At present, mental illness is seen as a police problem partly because other services have been defunded, and partly because harmless but abnormal behavior is criminalized. In Portland, where I live, there was a case a few years ago where the cops beat and killed a mentally ill man named James Chasse. Chasse wasn’t a criminal; he wasn’t even a suspect, in any real sense. The cops said later that they saw him on the street and thought he was acting “just odd.” So they approached him. He ran, they chased him. And when they caught him they beat him to death. Looking at this situation objectively: James Chasse was no threat to public safety, but the police really were.

Owl: Anarchists believe that community is based on strong relationships rather than a collection of people. What are some good ways of addressing social problems that build a stronger community?

In the long run, it’s the practice of working shit out together, even when it’s hard, even when people disagree — or especially then. I think we have to start by recognizing everyone’s humanity — victims, perpetrators, witnesses, the people who intervene. Literally, everyone. We also have to remember that the community isn’t just the people you happen to like. It’s your cranky neighbor, and the person who delivers the mail, and the people who go to the church down the street, and the kid who stole your bike. Community isn’t just the people you choose to relate to; even more it’s those people you can’t choose not to relate to, at least in some fashion. This is more than just a semantic question. If by “building community” we mean only our narrow friend group, then the anarchist movement will become increasingly isolated from our neighbors, families, co-workers and, in short, the rest of society. We’ll become more and more insular, irrelevant, and vulnerable to attack. Obviously, I’m not saying that people shouldn’t take care of their friends, form stronger ties with people they agree with ideologically, and all that sort of thing. But our political networks need to be rooted in the larger community. We need to look out as well as in. You’re right, of course, that a community is something more than a random assortment of people. It has to be built and sustained. Our society, especially in cities, and maybe even more so in suburbs, tends to be very isolating, very fragmented. The community ties are weak; people feel alone and powerless. Where we build stronger ties, where people know each other and know how to work together, that can change. When we build community, we also build a form of power. The state is very aware of that, and a lot of the practice of counterinsurgency is a matter of deciding which types of community — and therefore also, which types of power — to let develop. “Community policing”, in its fullest sense, is a strategy for fostering the types of community that the cops can control, those that provide them with support, intelligence, and legitimacy; and simultaneously, they try to disrupt those types of community that might form a basis for resistance. Our job, I think, is to do the reverse. As we do so, it will certainly help if we keep anarchist principles in mind: solidarity, mutual aid, reciprocity. Those don’t just characterize the kind of society we’d like to create; they are also the means by which we will build it.

Owl:People protested you at the Law and Disorder Conference because of an article calling out call-out culture and politics of denunciation. Can you tell us why they did that?

Well, the article was called the “Politics of Denunciation,” and you can find it at the Toward Freedom website. The point I was trying to make in it was that the tendency to denounce and exclude people — what’s sometimes broadly termed “call-out” culture — has some troubling political implications and may actually make it harder to address domestic violence, sexual assault, and other very real problems. Clearly there are some people who take issue with my view, or even with my right to have a view. But no one approached me about it before the event, so all I could really offer is my summary of what people said about it on the internet. Probably it’s better not to do that. If you want to know why people are angry with me, you should probably ask them.

Owl: Can you describe call-out culture? What I mean by call-out culture is the attempt to address harm — or sometimes, personal disagreements or ideological disputes — through individual vilification, public shaming, and social ostracism.

Owl: How does it differ from community accountability?

Call-out culture is implicitly punitive and often relies on rituals of humiliation. It generally offers no opportunities for any sort of resolution, or even reparations. I should say that I do think it’s sometimes important to involve the community in addressing a person’s misbehavior, and I think it sometimes makes sense to exclude people from particular places, events, or organizations. But exclusion on its own only solves the immediate problem, or may just re-locate it. It may remove a present danger, but people don’t just stop existing because we throw them out of the infoshop. So a transformative justice approach needs to give them both reasons and tools to change their behavior, while call-outs and ostracism basically just say, “Go be someone else’s problem.” And then there’s the issue of scale. If the only approach we have is denouncing and ostracizing people, what does that suggest about the society we’re trying to build?

Owl: How does a fixed dualism of victim and victimizer weaken a community’s potential to actually transform behavior?

Permanently branding someone as bad may make it hard to encourage personal change. And if the perpetrator starts thinking of himself as “a bad person,” rather than just a person who did some bad things, he may not even think it possible to change — especially if the people around him are telling him that it is impossible. Further, if the community’s response is to exclude people who are so stigmatized, the community effectively forfeits any opportunity to intervene in ways that would help push or support such change. All of that shifts the attention away from bad actions, the consequences, and the causes behind them (both personal and social) — and therefore also away from changes that might prevent future harm or help remedy past harm. Instead the focus becomes the identification and punishment of bad people. Given that we resist the punitive culture in the larger society, I think we shouldn’t reproduce it in the movement.

Owl: How does call-out culture weaken radical movements’ abilities to address violence, abuse and other impacts of patriarchy?

Individual vilification fails to address either the causes or the effects of patriarchy. It often substitutes denunciation of a perpetrator for actual accountability and supporting survivors. Because the focus is on punishing the perpetrator, the needs of the survivor — in terms of actual care work or even just personal safety — may be overlooked. Even if those things are central to the rhetoric, in practice the focus of the call-out is necessarily on the perpetrator. Also, when denunciations, shaming, and social exclusion are presented as the only possible responses, the effect is to treat all harm as the same. That makes it harder to address the underlying causes or the survivor’s individual needs. And it may well discourage some survivors from trying to address abuse if they don’t want to see the person who hurt them humiliated and ostracized. Likewise, public shaming makes it hard for perpetrators to admit that they’ve done something wrong, or try to atone for it. Then there’s the problem that people who work with a perpetrator to hold him accountable and change his behavior are themselves likely to get grief for not denouncing and ostracizing him. So, call-out culture produces all of these perverse incentives that make it harder to achieve justice, or personal transformation, or social change. Besides which, an environment where we believe every bad thing we ever hear about anyone else and automatically ostracize anyone who has done anything wrong creates all kinds of other problems. It practically guarantees that our movements will become more fragmented, more isolated, and more insular. The practices of denunciation and ostracism can be — and I would say, sometimes are being — used to silence questions and stifle political disagreements, making the movement less democratic and less able to improve its practices. And we have to expect that our enemies will notice and exploit these vulnerabilities. Documents from Britain’s GCHQ (their counterpart to the NSA) frankly discuss using fabricated allegations and anonymous blog posts to slander their targets, and leaked NSA documents show their strategists thinking along the same lines to discredit Muslim leaders. There’s no reason to think they wouldn’t do the same to anarchists.

Owl: Do anarchists know who they are and what they want?

Increasingly, no. At present, at least on the West Coast, anarchism exists as a kind of toxic cocktail blending elements of marxism, post-modernism, identity politics, deep ecology, and counter-culture lifestyle choices. As a result, the idea of a free and equal society is giving way to a creeping moralism spiced up with ultra-militant posturing. It’s pretty sad.

Owl:What is anarchism and how do we get there?

I believe anarchism is — or should be — both a philosophy and a movement. It represents an attempt to reorganize society based on the simple notion that decisions should be made by those most affected by them. The implications of that idea are radically egalitarian, require that power be decentralized and coercion minimized, and suggest that freedom must be exercised collectively as well as individually.

How do we get there? The only way is to build a movement capable of destroying the existing order and replacing it with something better. That will require the participation of millions of people, and they won’t all be queer punk vegan bicyclists living in West Coast cities. They won’t even all be people who consider themselves anarchists.

If we want to build a movement and change the world, we have to engage with society as it is, not try to remove ourselves from it. That’s hard, and it’s scary, and there’s no guarantee of success. But it is what we have to do.

 

Owl: Thank you Kristian, always a pleasure talking with you. Looking forward to seeing you 12/13/14 at the 7th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair at the Manila Community Center.

We in Humboldt Grassroots agree with your vision of anarchism. Anarchists should be engage with society as a whole to change it, specifically be in those movements with other oppressed people trying to create a better situation. Anarchism will always have a broader influence within communities when Anarchists are fighting along side others in a rainbow of struggles day to day to improve the situation in concrete ways through solidarity and direct action.

Luckily, the sad toxic cocktail you describe is not the whole story. There are also many signs that revolutionary anarchism is growing in depth and strength in this country.

One encouraging development is founding of *Black Rose Anarchist federation in early November 2013, class struggle groups convened for two-days in Chicago to form an anarchist federation within the United States. Some people from the Portland chapter of the BRAF are coming to speak at this years Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair also.

We’re stoked, thanks again for talking with me and for all of your great work.

 

 

*Black Rose Anarchist Federation check out: http://agendaforliberation.tumblr.com/, http://commonstruggle.org/node/2637

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The 7th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair

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                   The 7th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair!!!

Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair Schedule

Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair Schedule

Starting at 10 am to 6 pm Saturday December, 13th 12/13/2014 the second Saturday in December at 1611 Peninsula Drive, Manila (Arcata, CA), at the site of Redwood Coast Montessori School and the Manila Community Center. We’ll have publisher and campaign tables, a kid’s corner, and food in the main hall, and two rooms for presentations.

We are still looking for volunteers. The more the merrier, if you have an idea,  play an instrument, or want to help in any way get in touch.

We’re also looking for donations to help cover the costs of the space and travel for the speakers. If you want to help out in that way, you could get in contact, or use our new donation page: http://www.payitsquare.com/collect-page/54874

As always you can expect  free delicious food all day catered by Eureka & Arcata Food Not Bombs, and the food as usual will be so good! All the food cooked by FNB in past years has come from donations, and all the produce has been donated by local farmers. Coffee has been provided by  local roasters. The Book Fair is a day of community empowerment that tastes great!

Child care– The kids corner has drawings and books, puppets and toys, all sorts of fun stuff. Activities have included  face painting, paper making, readings, a puppet show, this year maybe a short play. We have the HGR-published coloring book The Walnut Tree by Kati Texas available at the kid’s corner for donation or free.

Activities in the kid’s corner depend on child interest, and adults will be around there for the whole event to entertain and supervise children.One year it became a child run discussion corner with story telling!

Pirate Radio! Humboldt Free Radio Alliance, will  MC the Anarchist Book Fair again

All the amazing publishers you have come to expect at The Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair like Slingshot, AK, PM Long Haul and the rest will be there, along with some new ones.

The theme this year is sharing ideas that we can use to become stronger, healthier and freer. Great inspiring ideas to help us cultivate resilience, overcome this oppressive system, and live in balance with nature.The Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair is chock full of ideas and practices that can be used day to day to create strong movements, to provoke life changing thoughts, all to help create a sustainable free cooperative society.

The Anarchist Book Fair builds bridges between people and social movements, It is a great time to get great books, learn about and get involved in amazing projects and that are happening.

Here is tentatively what you can expect this year. We are still in the process of organizing:

Andrej Grubacic

Andrej Grubacic is an anarchist dissident and historian who has written prolifically on anarchism and the history of the Balkans. He is a lecturer at the ZMedia Institute and University of San Francisco.  Author of Wobblies & Zapatistas: Conversations on Anarchism, Marxism, and Radical history

Kurdish rebels are establishing self-rule in war-torn Syria, resembling the Zapatista experience and providing a democratic alternative for the region.

He will be returning from Turkey before the book fair. To discuss the influence of Anarchism in Kurdistan, the realities on the ground and the best ways to help those in the fight. In addition to  some possible lessons from the Kurdish experience.

International Solidarity is needed. This  presentation is urgently relevant, and tall order , Andre Grubacic will write a better description of his presentation soon

Eco-defense Panel

There have been many successes in our area lately! EF!   success in the Mattole and Strawberry Rock! Also we hope  defenders of the Klamath River will be joining the panel.

We will hear from  all of them at the 7th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair.

Anarchism and agriculture:

Permaculture , growing self reliant communities, Anarchist farming takes the stage third year in a row of this popular discussion and workshop (This is tentative- will be something around growing food and building sustainable communities—check for current details)

If you are interested  in contributing to this conversation contact us.

There will be a workshop on Building accountable communities

This is a workshop on community accountability from the a community that has practiced successful community accountability processes in Humboldt county. A more thorough Bio for this workshop is coming. We are all eager to hear what the presenters have to say.

There will be authors of  More Than Two, Eve Rickert and Franklin Veaux will be giving a presentation

http://www.morethantwo.com/

“Can you love more than one person? Have multiple romantic partners, without jealousy or cheating? Absolutely! Polyamorous people have been paving the way, through trial and painful error. Now there’s the new book More Than Two: A practical guide to ethical polyamory to help you find your own way. With completely new material and a fresh approach, my partner  to expand on and update the themes and ideas in this website. “

Kristian Williams author of our enemies in blue: police and power in America will be giving a talk He has written many important books and is a member rose city Copwatch in Portland.  His interview is on this site.

Doug Gilbert

Doug Gilbert lives in the East Bay area and contributes to FireWorks <http://fireworksbayarea.com/>. He has also written for publications like Modesto Anarcho, Fire to the Prisons, The Earth First! Journal, and Rolling Thunder. He is the author of the new book, *I Saw Fire: Reflections on Riots, Revolt, and the Black Bloc.*

Members of The Black Rose Anarchist Federation in Santa Rosa

Will do an audiovisual presentation via Skype on the work they have been doing, and why organizing with the Black Rose Anarchist Federation, is helpful for making strong anti-authoritarian movements and ultimately creating a better world through social revolution.

The Black Rose Anarchist Federation is a U.S wide Anarchist political organization that formed in 2013 in Chicago, made up of class struggle anarchist groups who have been working together for years. They have been building on successful organizing—it will be awesome to hear from them

a U.S wide Anarchist political organization that formed in 2013 in Chicago, made up of class struggle anarchist groups who have been working together for years. They have been building on successful organizing—it will be awesome to hear from them

We are still in the process of setting the schedule of talks workshops puppet shows the works. If you are interested in helping, presenting have a suggestion or want to help, contact us:

Call (707) 267-7817 or Humboldt grass roots at rise up dot net

You can help put up posters! Print them out 8.5 by 11 and 8.5  by 14

poster12 (this one is 11 by 17)

poster8.5×11

poster8.5×14

 

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Saturday December 14th is Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair!


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The Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair (1611 Peninsula Dr, Manila, CA) on Saturday December 14th features a full day of workshops on a variety of topics, guest speakers, and great deals on independent and hard-to-find books and zines. Bring your kids to play at the Kid’s Corner and enjoy some delicious local food while meeting people who are working to make our community and the world a more revolutionary place.

6th Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair

 

The 6th Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair on Saturday December 14th is tomorrow! Here’s a sneak peek of some of the authors who will be speaking at this awesome event:
West of Eden: Communes and Utopia in Northern California

Iain Boal is author of *West of Eden: Communes and Utopia in Northern California,” a book that explores the deep historical roots of collective life on rural communes of Mendocino and Sonoma, as well as communal households of the Black Panthers in Oakland, and the Native American occupation of Alcatraz

 

 

Catastrophism: The Apocalyptic Politics of Collapse and Rebirth

James Davis is an Irish writer and film maker based in California. He is co-author of “Catastrophism,” a book that explores the politics of apocalypse on the left and right—and examines why the lens of catastrophe can distort our understanding of the dynamics at the heart of these numerous disasters—and fatally impede our ability to transform the world. His documentary films include Meeting Room, Safety Orange, and Autonomy and a Song.

Radical Mycology

 

Peter McCoy is co-founder of Radical Mycology, a movement and social philosophy based on accessibly teaching the importance of mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological health.

Radical Mycology is based on the belief that the lifecycles of fungi and their interactions in nature serve as powerful learning tools for how humans can best relate to each other and steward the world they live in.

Check out this video for more info, or click here for Radical Mycology’s introductory zine.

Booksellers and organizations that will be at the Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair include:

  • PM Press
  • AK Press
  • Slingshot Magazine/Organizer
  • People’s Action for Rights and Community
  • Women’s Resource Center
  • Rhizome Infoshop
  • Arcata Pirate Radio
  • Greenfuse
  • Black Riders Liberation Party
  • Industrial Workers of the World
  • Raven Project
  • Redwood Curtain Copwatch
  • Food Not Bombs
  • Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence
  • Giant Squid Print Collective
  • Community Bike Kitchen (bring your bike and learn to fix it!)
  • Emma Center
  • Little Black Cart
  • Sacramento Prisoner Support

Here’s the workshop schedule:

Workshop Room 1 Workshop Room 2
12:00 pm Ninason: Yurok Special Places with Jene        McCovey:   Yurok Elder speaks about Yurok tradition, ceremony, and special places 12:00 pm Sacramento Prisoner Support: Marie Mason and Eric McDavid update, and how to more effectively grow a culture of resistance that can breach the prison walls and sustain the activist community long term
1:00 pm Radical Mycology with Peter McCoy: Rad. Mycology is a movement and social philosophy based on teaching the importance of mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological health 1:00 pm Building Solidarity for Prisoners’ Struggle to End Torture in CA Prisons: Learn about the historic Pelican Bay hunger strike that spread across California as part of the strugge to end long-term solitary confinement and how you can show solidarity with the prison abolition movement
2:00 pm Radical Mycology (continued) is based on the belief that the lifecycles of fungi and their interaction in nature serve as powerful learning tools for how humans can best relate to each other and steward the world they live in 2:00 pm Dismantling Patriarchy discussion: All are welcome to a discussion on the powerful impacts of patriarchy and what changes we can make in our communities and selves to confront gender-based oppression. Facilitators: Women’s Reource Center and others
3:00 pm Organized Labor panel: IWW members and local Eureka waterfront, nursing, construction and grocery workers discuss experiences working and organizing on the job
4:00 pm Regional Earth Defense panel: discussion with Umatilla megaload anti-fracking acitvists, Cascadia Forest Defense, Will and Warbler from Little Lake Valley (threatened by Willits Bypass), and local Strawberry Rock tree-sitters from Trinidad. Bring some questions for Q+A! 4:00 pm West of Eden: Communes and Utopia in Northern California with author Iain Boal explores the deep historical roots of collective life on rural communes of Mendocino and Sonoma, as well as communal households of the Black Panthers in Oakland, and the Native American occupation of Alcatraz
5:00 pm Catastrophism: The Apocalyptic Politics of Collapse and Rebirth with author James Davis: explores the politics of apocalypse–on the left and right, in the environmental movement–and examines why the lens of catastrophe can distort our understanding of the dynamics at the heart of there numerous disasters–and fatally impede our ability to transform the world. 5:00 pm Black Riders Liberation Party from Oakland shows documentary “Let Em Hear Ya Comin,” which highlights the tactic of Confrontational Politics as used by the Black Riders

FREE TO ALL! Please donate generously.

P.S. We’re gonna smash a symbol of patriarchal oppression at the Afterparty at the Ink Annex in Eureka.

Bus times: Departs Arcata 9:20 am. Next bus leaves Manila to Arcata at 6:15 pm. Departs 5th and D Eureka @ 9:48 am, leaves manila to Eureka at 5:30 pm.

From Eureka: Take 255/Samoa Bridge and go right towards Arcata. Turn Left on Peninsula Drive, Manila Community Center is .5 miles on your left

From Arcata: Go south on 255/Samoa Blvd for 3 miles. After you pass Lupin, take a right on Pacific Ave (becomes Peninsula Dr). Manila Community Center will be on your right

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Root Beer Float Comedy Social (a benefit for the Bookfair) is Dec 11th!

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On Wednesday Dec 11th, come slam root beer floats and watch funny movies in preparation for the Humboldt Anarchist Bookfair, which is on Sat Dec 14.

$3 root beer floats all around for folks starting Wednesday December 11th at 7 pm at the Ink Annex (47 B W 3rd St, through alleyway behind Eureka Co-op).

Then the crowd will vote on what movie to watch, followed by an open mic for poetry, music, and performance.

A great way to meet people and support the Anarchist Bookfair, a day long event with free workshops and independent booksellers with a variety of rare political titles. Free food and childcare all day! An excellent day for the radical activist community in Humboldt and beyond.

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6th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair

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6thbookfaircolor6thbookfaircolor1Download the PDF  print it out and put it up!

 

The 6th Humboldt Anarchist Book fair is coming on December 14th!

WE CAN SELF ORGANIZE SOLUTIONS!

We are excited to have a wide variety of groups authors and other presenters from our communities working towards freedom and equality and harmony with the earth.

This year is the first year the poster has gone color.  That means it is going to be a bit more costly but it will be even more awesome! Also looking forward to a new locally made Anarchism themed coloring story book—more details later.

Check this website to get informed on many  fundraising and organizing  events that are being planned for before the book fair.  The Rhizome Info-shop is planned to be a buzz of activity. We need your help.

If you have an idea or question, want to table, host a talk or event, anything really get in touch!

humboldtgrassroots[at]riseup.net

It is all one struggle for freedom, so let’s get together for the book fair and stay together for what lays ahead.
James Davis 

We live in catastrophic times. The world is reeling from the deepest economic crisis since the Great Depression, with the threat of further meltdowns ever-looming. Global warming and myriad dire ecological disasters worsen—with little if any action to halt them—their effects rippling across the planet in the shape of almost Biblical floods, fires, droughts, and hurricanes. Governments warn that there is no alternative to the bitter medicine they prescribe—or risk devastating financial or social collapse. The right, whether religious or secular, views the present as catastrophic and wants to turn the clock back. The left fears for the worst, but hopes some good will emerge from the rubble. Visions of the apocalypse and predictions of impending doom abound. Across the political spectrum, a culture of fear reigns.

Catastrophism explores the politics of apocalypse—on the left and right, in the environmental movement—and examines why the lens of catastrophe can distort our understanding of the dynamics at the heart of these numerous disasters—and fatally impede our ability to transform the world. Lilley, McNally, Yuen, and Davis probe the reasons why catastrophic thinking is so prevalent, and challenge the belief that it is only out of the ashes that a better society may be born. The authors argue that those who care about social justice and the environment should jettison doomsaying—even as it relates to indisputably apocalyptic climate change. Far from calling people to arms, they suggest, catastrophic fear often results in passivity and paralysis—and, at worst, reactionary politics.

&

What it means when working people stand up on the job and fight back yesterday today and tomorrow

 

We will know for sure soon if…

 

Dave Karoly Evergreen Printing member of The Network of Bay Area Worker Cooperatives (Whose IWW print shop printed the color poster this years Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair)

The Network of Bay Area Worker Cooperatives or NoBAWC (pronounced “no boss”) is a grassroots organization of democratic workplaces dedicated to building workplace democracy in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.

As the name implies, NoBAWC is comprised primarily of worker cooperatives. A worker cooperative is an enterprise that produces goods, distributes goods and/or provides services and is owned and controlled by its worker-owners. Ownership of a worker cooperative is vested solely with the worker-owners on an equal basis. Moreover, worker-owners control the resources of the cooperative and the work process. Each worker-owner has equal decision-making power and ultimate authority rests with the worker-owners as a whole. Worker control can be exercised directly or indirectly by worker-owners. If exercised indirectly, members of representative decision-making bodies (e.g. a Board of Directors) must be elected by the worker-owners and be subject to removal by the worker-owners.

In addition to worker cooperatives, NoBAWC includes many Bay Area workplaces that incorporate democratic principles even though they do not satisfy the above definition of a worker cooperative. These include workplaces in transition toward becoming worker cooperatives and those that are democratically run but not worker owned. This latter category includes consumer cooperatives and non-profits that are democratically run by their staffs.

NoBAWC is comprised of small and medium-sized workplaces employing from a few to over 200 workers, representing diverse industries and sectors of the economy. Although all are democratic, their legal and organizational structures vary. Most are for profit while some are non-profit, most provide a living for their workers while some are volunteer-run and many utilize direct democracy while others use both direct and representational structures. A number of these workplaces have been operating successfully for many years, with some celebrating more than 30 years in business.

 

Chris Crass http://www.chriscrass.org/index.html

More details as they come.

maybe coming:

Cindy Millstine

Peter Gerderloos

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Towards Anarchy-Many Anarchist Projects are Growing in Humboldt

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Many Anarchist projects have been rolling and are picking up speed and steam since the 5th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair on December 8th, 2012. Amazing and vibrant scene and zine Humboldt D.I.Y, is coming out of Arcata, courtesy in large part from the Humboldt Garden Collective, and many people from the various houses and radical spaces of Arcata. Humboldt Grassroots introduced the most recent Humboldt DIY with a little call out for more Anarchist media and coordination and cooperation. (That will be available online soon- the zine is only hard copy format now)
It is great luck to have more anarchist media and this Humboldt DIY zine is a fun read.
If you’re not familiar with the Humboldt Gardening collective, you might remember The recent Anarchy and agriculture workshop at the 5th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair, presented by farmer Paul and Ryan of the Humboldt Garden Collective.
The Humboldt Gardening Collective are helping grow anarchism in Arcata by getting together and growing food. You will heat more about them on our site and elsewhere for sure.

But wait there’s more

The work shop on transformative justice and community accountability – One of the important local workshops at the 5th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair- has spawned a study group-studying and discussing ideas methods and Strateging to create community accountability processes that work for our communities.
This is important work, if we want meaningful solidarity we can all rely on, we need to be accountable to one another so that oppressive and fucked up behaviour doesn’t go unchecked. At the same time no one is perfect, and kicking out each person who does something messed up is not the greatest way to solve problems and encourage personal and community growth.
Also violence and ostracizing methods tend to help encourage friends of abusers to make excuses for their friends behavior.
It is a big undertaking we are starting with posters that will be available online and at the infoshop as soon as they’re made.
The transformative justice study group meets at the Crescent house in Arcata and the Rhizome infoshop in Arcata check on Facebook for current meeting details.
Oh! The Rhizome infoshop, thanks to 10 dollars a month throw in from in infoshop Members, and of course all the volunteer work in fundraising all the rest, we have internet cheaper copy service than staples and regular open hours. Plus the multimedia lending library is fully operational.

Last time I talked with our treasurer we are doing all that without relying to heavily on HGR general fund needed to start projects, basic upkeep (like this website) emergencies and to put out print media and put on the book fair(travel costs materials etc.)

This may come as a surprise to some, but we are already looking towards the next Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair. We need people who interested in learning how to put this all together, some newer bottom liners, experienced-and non experienced HABF volunteers, contact people brainstorming, poster designing and making .etc
We’re getting the 6th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair organizing collective together. So if you like the Book Fair consider helping put it on this year.
Everyone who wants to help will need to know deadlines and an idea of (brass tacks) how all the different components of the Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair come together. So we are organizing/calling out- to have a first meeting to let you get an idea. Veteran book fair organizers will share knowledge and experience with those who are new to it, and together we will come up with new ideas also.
Maybe a two day thing? An day of discussion like they do in SF? It is up to those who organize for it to decide.
So contact us lets get things going.

You can help with Humboldt Grassroots put this very important event on.
Contact Humboldtgrassroots@riseup.net
707-6164700

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5th Anarchist Book Fair December 8th 10am – 6pm Manila Community Center. 1611 Peninsula Drive. Arcata, CA 95521

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8.5 bookfair5th

Read about some of the workshops and people coming to share at the Book Fair…bookfair 2012 tri-fold.pdf final version

The 5th Anarchist Book Fair December 8th 10am – 6pm Manila Community Center. 1611 Peninsula Drive. Arcata, CA 95521

Scott Crow

4pm-6pm

The author of: Black flags and Windmills Black Flags and Windmills: Hope, Anarchy and the Common Ground Collective

When both levees and governments failed in New Orleans in the fall of 2005, scott crow headed into the political storm, cofounding a relief effort called the Common Ground Collective. In the absence of local government, FEMA, and the Red Cross, this unusual volunteer organization, based on “solidarity not charity,” built medical clinics, set up food and water distribution, and created community gardens. They also resisted home demolitions, white militias, police brutality, and FEMA incompetence side by side with the people of New Orleans.

crow’s vivid memoir maps the intertwining of his radical experience and ideas with Katrina’s reality, and community efforts to translate ideals into action. It is a story of resisting indifference, rebuilding hope amid collapse, and struggling against the grain. Black Flags and Windmills invites and challenges all of us to learn from our histories, and dream of better worlds. And gives us some of the tools to do so.

Seattle Solidarity Network Workshop  Seasol.org

Here’s a description. The workshop last for about an hour followed by discussion,

"Seattle Solidarity Network (SeaSol) is a US based workers’ and tenants’ mutual aid group which fight back against bosses and landlords when they do something like steal your wages or your damage deposit. By supporting each other through collective direct action, and winning these small fights we build our strength, experience and confidence, we can take on bigger opponents and take back more from the bosses – and we start to realize that we can do far more than that – we can create a new world…"

Community Accountability/restorative justice Discussion/ Workshop:

 Sacha Marini and Jessica Whatcott will present a workshop on Community Responses, Accountability & Interventions- Safety, Accountability & Community Transformation.

2pm-4pm

will focus on methods the community may use to address the source of injustice

Workshop Title: Transformative Justice: Safety, Accountability, & Community Transformation

"We are told to call the police and rely on the criminal justice system to address violence within our communities. However, if police and prisons facilitate or perpetrate violence against us rather than increase our safety, how do we create strategies to address violence within our communities, including domestic violence, sexual violence, and child abuse, that don’t rely on police or prisons?

Create and affirm VALUES & PRACTICES that resist abuse and oppression and encourage safety, support, and accountability"—Incite http://www.incite-national.org/index.php?s=114"

Workshop description:

Our community of anarchists, queers, trans folks, and direct action activists has struggled to BOTH critique and oppose the prison industrial complex AND seriously respond to violence in our communities, including rape, assault and domestic violence. How do we respond to violence if we want to abolish prisons? Rejecting cops, courts and prisons means we have to develop our own visions of justice that we can implement in our own communities.Transformative Justice attempts to balance providing safety for survivors, accountability for harmers, and community transformation of the conditions that perpetuate and support violence. This workshop will explore the history of alternative justice projects in Humboldt County, generate dialogue around the experiences people have already had with accountability, and describe models from around the country of Transformative Justice. Let’s have a conversation about the complexities of accountability and connect with

others who are doing this work in our community.

Presenters: Sacha Marini and Jessica Whatcott

Bios: Sacha Marini has an extensive background of anti-violence organizing and advocacy, and championing restorative justice and human rights in the criminal system. In 1999, she co-founded Bar None, a prisoner advocacy and human rights organization. Since 2000, she has also volunteered with California Prison Focus, a legal advocacy organization based in San Francisco that monitors and reports on the conditions of confinement at super max prisons in California. Inspired by her volunteer work, she obtained a Paralegal Certificate and an Associate of Science Degree in Paralegal Studies from College of the Redwoods in 2006. She then interned with several attorneys and the Public Defender’s office. She is the current Director of Boys & Girls Club of the Redwoods Teen Court Program. Sacha makes her home at Fancyland, a queer land project in Humboldt County

Jessica’s vision is world where violence is not used as a tool of systematic oppression and inequality. She studies and takes

action against all forms of violence, from state-level violence to

interpersonal control. Her areas of interest and research include prison abolition and building community-based accountability processes

and movements and strategies for ending sexualized violence and domestic

violence. Jessica teaches introductory courses for the Critical Race, Gender and Sexuality Studies department at Humboldt State University. She is an HSU alum. Her

Master’s thesis was titled "The Politics of Violence: An Intersectional Feminist

Audit of Institutions and Discourses in Humboldt County." Jessica also works for Humboldt County TeenCourt, where she helps to provide a diversion option for youth who have been arrested or cited for misdemeanor crimes.

For several years she volunteered as the outreach coordinator for Bar None, a local prison abolition and human

rights monitoring organization based in Humboldt County that works with

prisoners across the state of California.

Industrial Workers of the World

www.IWW.org

Learn what The IWW is  doing around the world. How you can help build a foundation for a militant democratic workers union movement in Humboldt county.

This workshop will cover: The Vision of the IWW.  What it takes to be a member of IWW. How and Why to Organize a general membership branch. how The General Membership Branch serves to support fellow workers in day to day struggles and long term campaigns to improve wages and conditions.

This workshop is a  for anyone who wants to get serious social and economic justice

IWW Union Organizers and union worker lead a Discussion of why+how and what it takes to organize on the job and in your industry to improve things for you and your fellow workers.

A union is two or more workers acting together to address issues on the job…

If just one workplace rises up the others wages may rise out of fear of the union…

Workshop Title: Radical Love 11am-1pm

WORKSHOP Description:Traditional models for relationships

tend to focus on monogamy, but many of us are looking for ways to support

alternatives. Declare yourself a revolutionary of the

heart and a radical love activist! Join us in exploring your potential to love

many people and navigating the complexities

around responsible and sustainable relationships. Radical love is the freedom to

love whom you want, how you want, as many

as you want, so long as personal integrity, respect, honesty, and consent are

at the core of all relationships. It primarily focuses on love and intimacy,

not sex and sexual conquest.

Presenter: Wendy-O Matik

BIO:Radical love warrior, Wendy-O Matik, author of Redefining Our Relationships:

Guidelines for Responsible Open Relationships, is leading the love

revolution with her book and her Radical Love

& Relationship Workshops. As an educator and spokesperson for

the polyamory community, Wendy has become a revolutionary activist of the heart.

She has taught over a hundred open relationship workshops internationally, helping to reshape the future of alternative relationship models for the 21st century. As an activist for social change, Wendy is pushing the boundaries on firmly rooted notions in mainstream society on relationships,love, gender, sexual equality, and sexual politics.

Earth First- description of the workshop will follow

Farmer Paul- Growing Anarchy Agriculture and building horizontal community

It seems from last years workshop, from relating to plants, we have a positive and resilient relationship with anarchy. Most people expressed the desire to grow food. How do we set up anarchist networks of meaningful food production and distribution that are horizontal, sustainable, and function in Solidarity with marginalized and oppressed communities. What will they look like? What communities will they serve? Please come to share ideas, network, make community and empower communities.

Revolutionary NonViolence Workshop & Brainstorm. “Revolutionary” – focusing on upending the hierarchal, classist, militarist, capitalist status quo. “Nonviolence” – pointing to open, honest and friendly civil resistance. “Workshop” – expecting hands-on group participation. ”Brainstorm” – suggesting uncensored discussion.

There are certain themes or threads to be expected such as 1) current potential of RNV in forest resistance, climate change actions, anti-capitalist, anti imperialist convergences, occupies, general strikes; 2) the relevance of RNV in light of Arab Spring (Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Syria et al), European uprisings (Greece, Spain, Italy…); 3) the importance of RNV in building a global justice, anti-national, anti-rich, working peoples’ movement; 4) RNV critique of standard “Church of Nonviolence’ mind-set as well as the occasional “pacifism as poison” positions; 5) reference to RNV practioners such as Barbara Deming, Dave Dellinger, Berrigan Brothers, Paul Goodman, Ammon Hennacy, Vandana Shiva, Dorothy Day, MLK, etc.; and even 6) exploring RNV as synonymous with anarchism.

Protest Tactics and safety

This expanded workshop brings experience from summits Local earth first actions EMT training and Direct action experience to make for a wealth of important information and training for anyone trying to be effective and keeping each other safe Out there

Contact HUMBOLDTGRASSROOTS@riseup.net 707-616-4700

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  • Posted on November 5th, 2012
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The 3rd humboldt Anarchist Bookfair Poster!

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