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Category Archives: The Rhizome Info-Shop

Poster 8.5x11 2016

The year 2015  was one of inspiring resistance and revolution. Let’s carry that same ferocity into the new year! We are glad to be starting 2016 off with the 8th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair.

The Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair plays a part in strengthening connections and solidarity for building a new world.

We are excited, as many of you are, about the Rojava revolution, along with the uprisings across the U.S. There is a lot happening; lots to talk about!

The 8th Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair is bringing it January 23rd, 2016!

This is a FREE, all-day, radical event! Join us in the main hall at 10am to nourish your body with some of the FREE FOOD cooked up by Food Not Bombs and friends (which they’ll be serving up the whole day), browse the tables of radical publishers and community groups, mingle with some good, free-thinking folk, listen to a little comedy from Robo and poetry from Gork and Jovannah. This is a family-friendly event with the Kid’s Corner featuring FREE CHILD CARE and activities, hosted this year by The YES House. The kid’s can hang out there while you move between the two meeting rooms to catch inspiring presentations from authors and activists and share your own ideas and experiences during interactive discussions, beginning at 11am.

Here is the line-up so far:

11am:
Room A:
Black Rose Anarchist Federation:
Black Rose is a nation-wide, anarchist federation in the U.S. that formed in 2013 and has been involved in struggles from Ferguson to Rojava. Hear about this ambitious and exciting project from Francisco, a member of Black Rose LA.

 
Room B:
Earth First!
Tales of frontline forest defense in so-called “Humboldt County.” With the last bits of old-growth forests remaining and the system’s failure to protect them, we must do it ourselves. From road blockades to tree-sits, defeats to victories. Hear the wolves howling and the owls hooting. For the wild!

12pm:
Room A:
Addressing Our Needs Through Direct Action and Cooperation:
Come join us for an open discussion led by Ryan Ayala, a recent graduate from HSU in Psychology. Looking at the Queer community, he will discuss the challenges of bureaucracy in making social change and ways in which such topics as harm reduction can be approached in substance abuse.

Room B:
Workers Power Panel:
The Industrial Workers of the World will once again be present at the Humboldt Anarchist Book Fair. Providing a glimpse into the Wobblie’s secrets of on-the-job organizing and spells to rid workers of bosses and other demons set against the working class by the atrocities of Capitalism. Whether you toil away your days taking orders from moms and pops for minuscule pay at restaurants and boutiques or you work at low paying, part-time jobs with no benefits at chain stores, you may benefit from a few devices to wrangle profits from the profiteers. Learn about and discuss successful job actions like slow-downs, sick-outs, safety meetings, and such. Discuss how to organize the aforementioned. Stay on the job earning meagre wages (which pay the rent) while you stick it to the boss. Remember you are a member of the working class, with a union card in your pocket. Whether you ride the rails, study in the library or toss pizzas, the IWW is here every day and we don’t contribute to slick politicians that promise one thing and do another. If you work, organize to improve working conditions. If you don’t work for a boss, carry your union card wherever you go. Meet Steve and Bruce, longtime Wobbly organizers and twenty-year members of the IWW. Steve is currently a ferry boat deckhand on San Francisco Bay. Bruce is a former truck and bus driver among other jobs.

1pm:
Room A:
Lessons for Rural and Small Town Anarchists:
Doug Gilbert discusses strategies and lessons learned from his involvement in the group Modesto Anarcho, based out of Modesto, California located in the Central Valley. Modesto Anarcho published a magazine of the same name, ran a social space, Firehouse 51, and was involved in a variety of struggles including organizing with families of those killed by police, gentrification, foreclosures, and housing, and much more. More than just a history, Gilbert will discuss how anarchists in small and rural towns face special challenges, especially in areas that do not have established anarchist groups and spaces.

Room B:
Crimethinc: Democracy or Freedom?
CrimethInc. ex-Workers’ Collective:
What’s the difference between democracy and anarchy?
Democracy is the most popular buzzword in politics. From the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the most radical social movements, nearly everyone claims to be democratic. In this provocative presentation, we will discuss what ties all these different understandings of democracy together and what sets anarchism apart. Reviewing how recent social movements have experimented with democratic rhetoric and practices, we will conclude by exploring other ways to understand what we are doing together when we make decisions.

2pm:

Room A:

The Governmentality of Immigration:

Human migration has created great challenges for both host societies and migrating communities, which have elicited dramatic responses from both populations. My academic and community work has examined the ways communities in Humboldt County have responded to changing social realities through the lens of governmentality (or the art and techniques of governance).  What I have attempted to do is to rigorously interrogate the various arts and techniques of governmentality. The investigation into this research topic is particularly timely because of the various legislative polices that are being advocated for on a local, state, and national level which has created an opportunity to further immigration advocacy work. Understanding that this is part of the work we must do because of the hardships the immigrant communities live under, it is not the end goal, which is to go beyond advocacy to dignity. My work uses the September 2008 raid on the Sun Valley Flower Farm as a starting point to explore the related social, political, economic, and cultural forces at play before, during, and after the raid. From there I continue the analysis to the current organizing efforts for immigrant policy reform in Humboldt County and beyond. Using militant research as a theoretical framework for the organizing work. I contend that the outcomes of this research can have local implications as it could inform local organizing efforts and unpack interlocking systems of oppression in operation in Humboldt County.

 
Room B:
Student Unions and Combative Syndicalism:
Fannie from Montreal will be Skyping in to talk about their experience in the largest and most successful student strike, which helped bring about the largest general strike in Canadian history. They will discuss the ideas, methods, and organization that made it all possible. There may also be organizers from HSU to present some of their organizing work.
http://freeeducationmontreal.org/confrontational-combative-syndicalism/

3pm:
Room A:
Anarchist Organizations In Social Movements Panel:
Members from Humboldt Grassroots, Black Rose Anarchist Federation LA, and Crimethinc will discuss how their organizations contribute to a wide variety of social movements and why it’s important to bring anarchist voices to these movements.

 
4pm:
Room A:
Slam Poetry Workshop:
Gork Burns and Jovannah Hoboo

Room B:
The Rojava Revolution:
Our keynote speaker will be Paul Z. Simmons, journalist, and author recently back from the Rojava Revolution. Writing under the pen name, El Errante, he is the author of a series of recent dispatches from the liberated territories of Rojava in Northern Syria. Simons has just returned from a region besieged by war yet is also in the midst of one of the most far-reaching social experiments of the 21st Century: the ‘Rojava Revolution.’ The liberated territories of Rojava are a thriving example in new forms of democratic practice and of a people who are overturning traditional, coercive institutions in favor of direct democracy and the empowerment and enfranchisement of women. Simons talks about his experiences including crossing international boundaries under false pretenses, attending commune meetings in Kobane, high-velocity detours around ISIS sympathetic villages, and the camaraderie of the YPG militias. Simons had full access to the various revolutionary organizations and militias and will discuss their mandates and implementation issues associated with realizing a new society. Paul Z. Simons’ report is a part adventure, part journalism, and part political analysis, of the Rojava Revolution.

We are sad to report that Michael Knapp, from TATORT Kurdistan, who was going to be visiting us from Berlin, Germany to discuss his own experience with the Rojava Revolution, has been denied entry by the U.S. government due to a recent policy which allows them to turn away without cause or explanation anyone who has even visited Northern Syria. How convenient during this refugee crisis. FUCK BORDERS!

5pm:
Room A:
Radical/ Independent Media Panel:
Greenfuse, Humboldt Free Radio Alliance, Slingshot, and 5th Estate.

You’re SO in, right?! Worried about how you’re gonna get there? We thought of that too! The Manila Community Center is one of the stops on the Redwood Transit Line that travels between Eureka and Arcata with stops in Manila. Get on the bus for us!

On Thursday, Feb 13th the Ink Annex will host a workshop and discussion on confronting sexual violence.

We will be sharing tools and resources that will help empower participants to support loved ones who have survived sexual assault.

Topics include definition of terms, identifying silencing behaviors, supporting survivors in the short and long term, why sexual assault is a community-wide issue, holding perpetrators accountable, and further reading (print-outs available).

Whether or not you have experienced sexual abuse personally, the information in this workshop will help you to act as an ally to survivors of sexual assault.

The workshop will be on Thursday, February 13th from 6:00 to 9:00 pm at the Ink Annex in Eureka.

The Ink Annex is located at 47 W 3rd St, through the 3rd St alley behind the Eureka Co-op.

A light meal, snacks and tea will be served.

Workshop is Thursday Feb 13 from 6 to 9 pm at Ink Annex in Eureka

Workshop is Thursday Feb 13 from 6 to 9 pm at Ink Annex in Eureka

TAKE BACK THE COMMONS

 

Arkley and his Buddies War on the Poor

by Cassandra

The Devils Playground is located behind the mall just past the bushes; a place known by local artists as the best public art gallery. There are also about a hundred people living back there, including families. There are even second generation residents.

This eviction equates the destruction of homeless camps, and the intimidation of those who stay. The people who are pushed out, who have it really hard as it is, are left with no where else to go. We can’t fix the “homeless problem” by trying to push them out; people don’t disappear into thin air just because they lost their homes. Instead, they’re becoming refuges from this man-made disaster.

The Devil’s Playground is not a safe or sanitary place to live, but this is more the city’s fault than the squatters. The city never installed garbage cans or toilets in the Devils Playground despite the obvious environmental need over the last 15 plus years. How can anyone be surprised by buckets of human waste, when there’s no toilets back there? And all those pallets that were hauled away aren’t just random trash; fires is how you stay warm when you’re living outdoors. There is still a serious need for trash service. If the garbage company stopped collecting for houses, the streets of Eureka would be filled with trash pretty soon.

The city is evicting the Devil’s Playground residents under the pretense of concern for public health and the environment. Meanwhile, the Eureka bay and all the areas surrounding it are incredibly contaminated by Dioxins and other carcinogens and toxins from the mill that used to operate in the area that is referred to as Parcel 4. This area includes the Devil’s Playground, which they have never done anything to decontaminate.

 

Instead they provided a grant to New Directions to manipulate homeless people into volunteering to dismantle camps and pick up trash. New Directions will pay these homeless workers for about 60% of the hours they work, and their workers don’t have many other options for employment. So homeless people are being paid less than minimum wage to destroy homeless camps, which in the end leaves these same people in a worse situation than before. They have a little more cash in their pockets but there’s far fewer places to stay now. These evictions shine yet again a light on how desperately our community needs at least an affordable place to camp.

There are deeper issues at play here than merely bad policies regarding sanitation and treatment of the poor and homeless. It isn’t just bad policy, in fact it isn’t even an accident. This act of destroying of a long time encampment area, even though it’s outside of the public eye, is part of a very ugly process. This act is a political push, that is in step with a very troubling ideology that is currently wreaking havoc across the country and around the globe.

 

Humboldt County politics have always boiled down to class war, whether the working class, employed and unemployed, get a share and a say in their community. This today is expressed in the fight over services and resources for the poor and homeless. It’s a constant struggle to hold on to affordable housing, healthcare, food, and education while people with sway in local and state politics lobby to end these services. Right now, these local elite and politicians are pooling their resources to get rid of these social services. Why? Because if they make enough cuts to affordable housing, social security and food stamps, many of the people considered “eyesores” will be forced to move on. If you agree with this policy, think again; If these elitists succeed, don’t think they will see a distinction between homeless people and the working class people who are the backbone of Eureka.

 

The Eureka city government wants to serve the well-to-do, attract businesses and wealthy and upper middle class families into the area. Businesses and wealthier individuals pay more taxes; meaning the city “as a business” will do better. This is an ideological conception of the city’s main purpose being to make money, rather than serving as a home where we care for one another. This idea reduces us all to consumers who either pay or are in the way, because in business the bottom line is all that matters.

 

The people who are pushing to cut services and kick out homeless people at any price, are the same ones who would have us believe that homelessness, unemployment, and addiction are all self-inflicted problems—not at all a result of a social system that creates and perpetuates the environments that necessitate all of them. The city’s local elites and their allies complain of impoverished people destroying the environment. At the same time, they try to develop and profit off of plots of land never cleaned up from corporate toxic waste dumping.

 

Attacking the homeless and their camps and evicting them, when the city has provided nothing for them is worse than shameful. It lays bare an ideology of economic progress over people—profit over people—at a time when poverty and desperation increase and the climate stutters and groans under an unsustainable way of life.

 

The way the economic and environmental crisis is going, anyone could be put out of doors any time. There is little doubt that the number of climate refugees and economic refugees will increase, with nowhere for anyone to go unless we establish a camp site. If the city is our home we the people should take care of each other. We should protect our home from the business interests who would harm and rob us. Should we as a community take back our dignity by establishing a more healthy place to live? For example, establishing a camp site now, as a temporary place to stay. We can easily fit a camp with composting toilets, trash cans and water using the appropriate technology skills and know-how that is available in droves in our community.

 

We need resources for locals who have been thrown out in the cold by our local economy. Everybody should have solidarity from their fellow workers, employed or not, because their fate could easily be yours. We need to get together and find a way to get our dignity and integrity as a community back.

Come on Friday May 10th for a fun-filled night of circus performance, Humboldt bluegrass, local folk music, beers, DJs and dancing till late with friends old and new. 

Featuring:

            Sunshine and Yellabird (raucous folk)

            Mad River Rounders (Humboldt bluegrass jams)

            DJ Derail (Liberation Soundclash)

 and circus performances by Circus of the Elements.

+ $2 Mad River Brews! (with ID) 

$5 at the door gets you in to the party and helps support your local grassroots community!

All proceeds will benefit the Rhizome Infoshop, a radical lending library and community resource center in Eureka. We offer anarchist books and zines, free Internet, and low-cost copying.

The Rhizome Infoshop is inside the Ink Annex (47B W 3rd St in Eureka), 1 block south of the Eureka Co-op in the 3rd Street alley.

Bring your friends and come party for the cause on Friday, May 10th at 7:00 pm @ the Ink Annex in Eureka. See you there!

Contact: rhizomeinfoshop@gmail.com

Phone: 707-440-9310